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Album Reviews

Southern Avenue’s Debut Album is the Beginning of a Legacy

There's a new sound coming from Memphis, but it's as familiar as mom's cooking.

Samantha Fish Gives Us ‘Chills & Fever’

Her restate of the vintage soul, rock 'n' roll, and blues sounds on which we grew up is as comfortable as our favorite jeans.

New Release From Beth Hart Lights a ‘Fire on the Floor’

If you aren't already a devotee, this album will not only convert you, but will baptize you in the fire that is Beth Hart.

John Mayall Scores Again with ‘Talk About That’

In our opinion, this is the some of the best music that Mayall has laid down in years. 'Talk About That' is exciting, varied, and satisfying, and will be viewed as a milestone work...

TBT – Joe Cocker’s Thrown Together Epiphany, ‘Mad Dogs & Englishmen’

In 1970 Cocker was given only nine days to put together a band for his upcoming tour. Up against the wall and without a band, he turned to his friend Leon Russell for help.

Todd Albright Takes Us Back and Brings Us Home

Albright plays with heart, daring, and conviction. For us, these interpretations really brought home just how well these songs have stood the test of time.

The Beatles As Blues – ‘You Can’t Do That’

It's well known that the Beatles began as a skiffle group in England. Steeped in blues and R&B influences, they almost single-handedly created the genre of pop music. But what would have happened, had...

Delbert McClinton’s ‘Prick of the Litter’ is an Easy Going Southern Brunch

'Prick of the Litter' features lounge-style originals by a career blues and rock musician with a casual elegance and a sense of humor.

‘Sonny & Brownie’s Last Train’ a Loving Tribute

This release isn't for the Saturday night, boogie-woogie crowd. It's for those of us who still enjoy a glass of sweet tea on a Sunday afternoon. If you fit that category, you'll be doing yourself a disservice by not immediately purchasing this first-rate record.

Eliza Neals Takes Listeners ‘10,000 Feet Below’ The Blues

Henry Stuckey may well have invented the "gothic" blues sound, but Skip James took it to the next level, Ledfoot gave it the name, and now, Neals has perfected it.
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